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Wildlife we love

Protect them

Story by ACF June 25th, 2015

WILDLIFE WE LOVE

Australia’s wildlife is magnificently diverse. So many of our unique animals can be found nowhere else in the world. Our special creatures are beautiful. They also play a critical role in life in Australia. Healthy ecosystems depend on the contribution of all living things within them. Cassowaries play a vital seed dispersal role in the Wet Tropics. Flying foxes are master pollinators and secure biodiversity and food supply. And koalas are part of what make us uniquely Australian.

But right now our precious wildlife is under more pressure than it can take. Mining, logging, land-clearing and global warming are destroying habitat and driving threatened species towards extinction.

We have a responsibility to protect our wildlife from harm and make sure life in Australia thrives for generations to come. You can make a difference.

DONATE BEFORE 30 JUNE TO PROTECT OUR THREATENED WILDLIFE

ENDANGERED: The tiny Southern Black-throated Finch is threatened by a mega coal mine
VULNERABLE: The Grey-headed Flying Fox's habitat is rapidly shrinking
ENDANGERED: Much of the Southern Cassowary's habitat has been wiped out by reckless developments
ENDANGERED: so few of the tiny Mountain Pygmy-possum are left in the Alps
ENDANGERED: This dazzling creature is part of an endangered ecological community in Sydney’s water catchments
ENDANGERED: soon the beautiful Swift Parrot will have no place to go
CRITICALLY ENDANGERED: the fragile little Leadbeater's Possum could be wiped out by logging

UNDER THREAT

Much of our unique wildlife lives along the mountainous corridor of the Great Dividing Range. Its rich biodiversity provides an essential climate refuge for over 70 per cent of our threatened species. But right now our magnificent Range and the wildlife that depends on it, has never needed us more.

Despite its vital role sustaining life in Australia, over the last two centuries, nearly 70 per cent of the Range has been degraded, fragmented and polluted from mining, logging and land clearing. But there is hope. If we act now to protect and connect critical habitat along the Range, we can restore life to our threatened species so they can thrive again.

DONATE NOW TO OUR CAMPAIGN TO PROTECT AND CONNECT CRITICAL HABITAT ALONG THE GREAT DIVIDING RANGE

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WE ARE ALL CONNECTED

We often forget that the fate of our wildlife is intimately connected to ours. The Range is the heartland of eastern Australia. Almost three quarters of Australians live along the inland western slopes, eastern escarpment and adjoining coastal plains. From the carbon stored in the dense forests, to the rivers that flow from its rugged slopes to support our food-bowl, the Murray-Darling Basin – our livelihoods depend on its healthy ecosystems.

Seemingly small changes, such as the loss of a key pollinating species like the grey-headed flying-fox, could have huge impacts on our future food supply. Contamination of our vast water catchments from mining won’t just affect our threatened wildlife but will impact our access to clean drinking water.

Communities along the Range are doing wonderful things to restore habitat locally. But without a national solution to address the issues driving its destruction, they can’t keep up.

YOU CAN HELP. DONATE BEFORE 30 JUNE TO OUR NATIONAL CAMPAIGN TO PROTECT THE RANGE

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PhD student, Stanley Tang has dedicated his work to gathering vital genetic information on the endangered Southern Black-throated Finch so he can provide useful guidelines for its conservation. The finch’s last stronghold is in the Galilee Basin and could be wiped out by proposed Carmichael Coal Mine.

“After fruitlessly scouring the harsh country of central Queensland for days in search of the endangered Southern Black-throated Finch, the moment I finally heard its familiar descending whistle was one of relief and thrill. The 400-strong flock of birds that filled the sparse trees took my breath away.”

YOU CAN HELP!

We all have a responsibility to look after our community of all living things. With your urgent donation, we’ll launch a national campaign to protect the vital life source of the Great Dividing Range.

Donate before June 30